Trees in Hiroshima

1. Weeping Willow (Salix babylonica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 370m

On the Motomachi riverbank of the Ota River

14 Motomachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

The A-bombed tree closest to the hypocenter. A few minutes' walk from the Atomic Bomb Dome, located to the north of the T-shaped Aioi Bridge on the east bank of the Honkawa River. Aioi Bridge, about 300 meters from the hypocenter, was the target of the atomic bombing because of the visibility from the air of its unique T shape and its location at the very center of the city. The willow tree fell at the time of the atomic bombing, but new buds sprouted from the roots. There are many cherry trees along the river and in spring people enjoy cherry blossom viewing.

2. Kurogane Holly (Ilex rotunda)

Distance from the hypocenter: 410m

Rai Sanyo Shiseki Museum

5-15 Fukuromachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located in the Japanese garden at the Rai Sanyo Shiseki Museum, adjacent to an A-bombed building (former Bank of Japan). The tree was burned down, leaving only a stump, but it miraculously sprouted in 1949. Rai Sanyo (1781-1832), a scholar who wrote Nihon Gaishi on Japanese history, was born in Osaka but raised in Hiroshima. He was the eldest son of a scholar, Rai Shunsui. His family moved to this location in 1790. When he illegally left Hiroshima without permission in 1800, he was arrested and confined to the small room in the tiny house facing the garden for three years, and under less-severe house arrest for another two. During those years, he started writing Nihon Gaishi. (Nihon Gaishi was completed in 1826 and published after his death. It became a best seller.)

A museum called Sanyo Kinenkan was constructed here in 1935, and in 1936, this tiny house in which Sanyo had been confined was designated as a national historic site. At the time of the atomic bombing, the museum was heavily destroyed, and the house was burned down. After the war, the museum building was repaired and used as a social education facility. The house was also reconstructed in 1958 by the prefectural government. In 1995, the museum building was renovated and opened as the Rai Sanyo Shiseki Museum. At that time, the bamboo garden and some other small gardens at this museum were developed by Nakane Kinsaku (1917-95), a famous landscape gardener who also designed the Japanese garden at Adachi Museum in Shimane Prefecture. The gate, walls along the street and stone pavement to the museum are originals from Sanyo Kinenkan. Inside the museum, there is a Japanese tea room. If the room is not in use, anyone can enjoy Japanese tea and a cake at additional 250 yen. (Prior reservation is preferred for Japanese tea: 082-542-7022.) (Open: 9:30-17:00 Admission: 300 yen (adult). Closed on Monday. When Monday is a holiday, it is closed on the following day.)

Reference (in Japanese)

3. Weeping Willow (Salix babylonica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 450m

Hanover Garden

5 Motomachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located in the Hanover Garden near the city's planetarium (Hiroshima Children's Museum). Gokoku Shrine, the Hiroshima First Army Hospital and the Western Drill Ground of the Army were around here at the time of the atomic bombing. Some of the many willow trees around here survived.

The Hanover Garden was created in 1980 as a symbol of the friendship between Hiroshima and Hanover, which concluded a sister-city relationship in 1983. From 1952 to 1978, the Children's Library was located at the site of today's Children's Museum. The library, designed by Tange Kenzo, was built with donations from the Southern California Hiroshima Kenjinkai (prefectural association) and others. A miniature of the library is exhibited on the second floor of the Children's Museum. The original explanation board of the Children's Library is kept on the first floor.

Reference 1, Reference 2,『基町地区再開発事業記念誌』 広島県都市部住宅課 1979 年

4. Camphor Trees (Cinnamomum camphora)

Distance from the hypocenter: 490m

Shirakami Shrine

7-24 Nakamachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima-shi

There are three A-bombed camphor trees at Shirakami Shrine. Everyone at the shrine died at the time of the atomic bombing. The trees were burned, but the roots survived. This location was the seafront until early Edo period. In order to prevent shipwrecks, white paper ("shira-kami" in Japanese) was put on a rock here. “Kami” also means “god.” At the same place, a shrine was built.

5. Silverberry (Elaeagnus pungens)

Distance from the hypocenter: 520m

Seijuji Temple

2-5-13 Honkawa-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

The tree was burned, but it sprouted later. The dead tree standing next to it is a cherry tree burned by the atomic bomb. The temple was established in Yoshida to the north of Hiroshima in the early 16th century. It was moved to this location in 1590 at about the same time when the feudal lord Mori Terumoto built Hiroshima Castle and moved from Yoshida to Hiroshima. This was one of the biggest temples in Hiroshima until it was burned by the atomic bombing.

6. Persimmon and Others (Diospyros kaki)

Distance from the hypocenter: 530m

Atago Pond

Hiroshima-ken, Hiroshima-shi, Naka-ku, Nakamachi, 7

Located in front of the ANA Crowne Plaza Hotel, along the Peace Boulevard, adjacent to Shirakami Shrine. In addition to the persimmon tree, there are other A-bombed trees, including a hackberry, muku trees (Aphananthe aspera), kurogane hollies and a bead tree. Kokutaiji Temple, established in 1601, was located here, and the sunken ground indicates the location of a pond, called Atago-ike. The rocks show that this was seashore before. Atago Shrine was here in the precincts of Kokutaiji Temple. In 1978, Kokutaiji Temple was moved to Koi, in the western part of Hiroshima.

7. Eucalyptus and Giant Pussy Willow (Eucalyptus melliodora; Salix chaenomeloides)

Distance from the hypocenter: 740m

Hiroshima Castle

21 Motomachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

The eucalypt is 740 meters away from the hypocenter. It was probably planted here in the early 20th century. It broke at 2.5 meters above the ground in a typhoon in 1971, but sprouted again.

The giant pussy willow is 770 meters away from the hypocenter. The tree has round leaves, so it is called "maruba-yanagi" in Japanese, meaning "round-leaf willow." It has a big scar, but it looks well taken care of and thriving.

Hiroshima Castle was established in 1589 by Mori Terumoto (1553-1625), who lost the War of Sekigahara in 1600 and was ordered to leave Hiroshima for today's Yamaguchi Prefecture. After Mori's departure, Fukushima Masanori (1561-1624) became the lord of Hiroshima, where he settled around 1601. But he too was ordered to leave Hiroshima by the Shogun in 1619, for the sin of repairing a part of the stone walls of the castle destroyed by a typhoon without the Shogun's permission. After Fukushima left, Asano Nagaakira (1586-1632) became the lord of Hiroshima. The ruling of the Asano family in Hiroshima continued for 12 generations until 1871. The main function of "Ninomaru" (the second compound) is to protect the innermost area of the castle, "Honmaru." Ninomaru was originally constructed from around 1598 to 1600. The wooden bridge leading to Ninomaru and the gate called "Omote Gomon" (meaning "front gate" or main gate) were reconstructed in 1991. The turrets at Ninomaru were reconstructed in 1994.

Reference (in Japanese)

8. Catalpa (Catalpa bignonioides)

Distance from the hypocenter: 760m

Chuo Park

15 Motomachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located in the north of the Central Park (Chuo Koen). The tree was probably transplanted here when this area was redeveloped. There are many trees in this corner of the park and it is pleasant to walk along the streams running through it. The water comes from the Ota River, goes through the stream in the north part of the park into the castle moat. The water, then, goes from the moat through the stream in the south part of the park and returns back to the river. In this way, the water in the castle moat is kept clean. The tall apartment buildings to the north of the park are the Motomachi high-rise apartment buildings, a public complex built in the 1970s, including an elementary school and a kindergarten. There were makeshift wooden houses built here from 1946 onward by the city government. There is a Chinese garden called Yuhua Garden in the southwestern corner of the park. This garden was created in 1991 to commemorate the conclusion of a sister-city agreement between Hiroshima and Chongqing, China, signed in 1986.

Reference 1, Reference 2,『都市の復興-広島被爆 40 年史-』広島市 1985 年

9. Japanese Fern Palms (Cycas revoluta)

Distance from the hypocenter: 890m

Jo-onji Temple

3-10-4 Otemachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

The palms were burned by the atomic bomb but sprouted again from the roots. When the current temple building was constructed, the palm trees were moved to the present locations from near the gate of the temple. The grave of a famous novelist, Suzuki Miekichi (1882-1936), is located here.

10. Peonies and "Shirodamo" (Paeonia suffruticosa; Neolitsea sericea)

Distance from the hypocenter: 890m

Honkyoji Temple

3-13-11 Otemachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

There are red peonies, planted at several places in this temple. Both the peonies and the "shirodamo" (Neolitsea sericea) were burned by the atomic bomb but sprouted again from the roots.

11. Kurogane Holly (Ilex rotunda)

Distance from the hypocenter: 910m

Hiroshima Castle

21 Motomachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located at Hiroshima Castle's Honmaru (main compound). It is said that there are three A-bombed kurogane hollies here. These trees were in front of the building used as the Imperial Headquarters during the Sino-Japanese War (1894-95). The building was completely destroyed by the atomic bomb. Today, only its foundations remain. The castle tower was also destroyed by the atomic bomb but rebuilt in 1958 as a history museum.

Down the stairs from the kurogane hollies, there is a shrine called Gokoku Shrine, relocated to this place in 1956. Next to the shrine was a semi-underground facility used by the Chugoku Regional Military Headquarters during WWII as an air-defense communication room. Mobilized students from Hijiyama Girls' High School worked here during the war, passing along the information on air-raid warnings to government facilities and media.

12. Kurogane Holly (Ilex rotunda)

Distance from the hypocenter: 940m

Kinryuji Temple

9-37 Komachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

There are two kurogane hollies which survived the atomic bombing. Kinryuji Temple was established in 1632, but all was lost by the atomic bomb. It was rebuilt in concrete to celebrate the 370th anniversary of the foundation of the temple.

13. Camphor Tree (Cinnamomum camphora)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1010m

In the parking lot of the public apartments at Motomachi, near the Ota River

16 Motomachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located in the parking lot of the public apartments at Motomachi, near the Ota/Honkawa River. These low-rise apartment buildings were built by the municipal and prefectural governments. There is a nice promenade along the river to the south of this tree. These riverbanks were redeveloped in the early 1980s, based on the design of Nakamura Yoshio (1938-) and others, who won the Civil Engineering Design Special Prize in 2003. There were so-called A-bomb slums around here after the war. Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms by Kono Fumiyo is a beautiful manga that tells a story of this area after the war.

Reference (in Japanese)

14. Cherry Trees (Prunus × yedoensis)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1050m

Hiroshima City Hall

1-6-34 Kokutaiji-machi Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located in front of the city hall. There are three A-bombed cherry trees--two on the north and one on the south sides. The present city hall was built in 1985 at the site of the former city hall (built 1928; dismantled 1985). The former city hall was also a concrete building, but everything inside was burned. It was used as a temporary first-aid station after the atomic bombing, and a part of the basement has been left as a small museum. Masuda Kiyoshi (1888-1977) who designed the former city hall also designed Taishoya kimono shop, now the city's "Rest House," where a tourist information office is located. It was built in 1929 and is one of the A-bombed buildings in Hiroshima. He also designed Honkawa Elementary School, built in 1928, a part of which has been left as a museum.

Reference: 『被爆 50 周年 ヒロシマの被爆建造物は語る―未来への記録』 広島 市 1996 年 『近代日本の建築活動の地域性―広島の近代建築とその設計者たち』 李明・石丸紀興 渓水社 2008 年

15. Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1100m

Zenshoji Temple

3-11 Teramachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Red blossoms bloom in summer. The tree was moved from the west side of the precincts near the streetcar tracks to the present location when the temple was renovated. In the early 17th century, lord Fukushima Masanori gathered many temples of Jodo Shinshu (True Pure Land School) in this area to protect the castle. Thus this area is called "Teramachi," meaning "temple town." As these temples were protected by the succeeding lords of Hiroshima, Jodo Shinshu prospered in this province.

16. Camphor Tree (Cinnamomum camphora)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1110m

Motomachi Apartmens, near the police box

20 Motomachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located at the Motomachi high-rise apartment buildings near the police box. At about 30 meters, this is the tallest of all A-bomb trees. These high-rises are municipal and prefectural apartment buildings built in the 1970s, designed by Otaka Masato (1923-2010), whose teacher, Maekawa Kunio (1905-1986) was a student of Le Corbusier. You can see a strong influence of Le Corbusier on these apartment buildings. Looking east from the police box, there is a very modern building, located to the north of the castle. It is Motomachi Senior High School. The school was relocated from Nakahiro to this place in 1947, after losing 369 teachers and students in the atomic bombing. The present buildings of the high school were built in 1998 and 1999, designed by Hara Hiroshi (1936-), who also designed Kyoto Station. This is the only public school in Hiroshima that has escalators for students. The Hiroshima Army Cadet School was located at the site of the high school until the end of the war.

Reference 1: 『被爆50周年 図説戦後広島市史 街と暮らしの50年』 広島市 1996 年 『被爆 50 周年 ヒロシマの被爆建造物は語る―未来への記録』 広島 市 1996 年, Reference 2 (in Japanese)

17. Camphor Tree (Cinnamomum camphora)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1120m

At the northeast corner of Hiroshima Castle, outside the moat

21 Motomachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located outside the moat of the castle, at the northeast corner, near Hakushima Elementary School. The tree is bent due to the atomic bombing. The Hiroshima Army Cadet School was located around here to the north of the castle, and remains of the gate's stone poles stand near the tree. Hakushima Elementary School and Motomachi Senior High School are now located on the former site of the Cadet School. The elementary school was originally located a few hundred meters to the northeast of today's location. Hundreds of students as well as the principal died in the atomic bombing. In October 1945, the elementary school resumed teaching at a temporary school building at the present location.

Reference (in Japanese), 『被爆 50 周年 ヒロシマの被爆建造物は語る―未来への記録』 広島 市 1996 年

18. Camphor Tree (Cinnamomum camphor)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1120m

At the south side of the government apartment buildings for court officials

2 Kami-hatchobori, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

The camphor tree survived the atomic bombing of August 6, 1945.

19. Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1130m

Hosenbo Temple

3-3 Teramachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

It is said that at the time of the atomic bombing, the large ginkgo tree at Hosenbo Temple in Teramachi prevented the collapsed temple from burning down entirely. (The head priest and three of his family members were killed, however.) The tree itself was terribly burnt but sprouted several years later. After using a temporary hall for many years, the new main hall of the temple was finally constructed in 1994. They did not want to cut the tree, so the ginkgo tree is now standing in a big hole created in the staircase that leads to the main entrance (there are openings for ventilation in the staircase, so the tree would not suffocate). It is said that the temple was originally established in Kabe, to the north of Hiroshima, in the late Kamakura period (1192-1333), but was moved to this area in the late 17th century. All the temples in Teramachi are Jodo Shinshu temples. Jodo Shinshu, meaning True Pure Land School, has prospered in Hiroshima.

Reference: 『歩いて見てほしい ひろしま原爆の木たち』 大川悦生 たかの書 房 1995 年

20. Japanese Fern Palm (Cycas revoluta)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1150m

Hiroshima Betsuin of Nishi-Honganji Temple

1-19 Teramachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located at Hiroshima Betsuin of Nishi Hongaji Temple in Teramachi. The temple was established in 1459, and moved to this place in 1609 by lord Fukushima Masanori. The fern palm was drawn in a picture about 100 years ago. In 1964, when the main hall of the temple was rebuilt after the atomic bombing, the palm tree was moved to its present location beside the belfry. All the temples in Teramachi are Jodo Shinshu temples. Jodo Shinshu, meaning True Pure Land School, has prospered in Hiroshima.

References (in Japanese)

21. Camphor Tree (Cinnamomum camphora)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1160m

On the sidewalk at the southeast corner of Tenma Elementary School

1 Tenma-cho, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima

Located on the sidewalk at the southeast corner of Tenma Elementary School near the Tenma River.

22. Plane Trees (Platanus orientalis)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1270m

Tenma Elementary School

1-27 Tenma-cho, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima

There are four A-bombed plane trees at Tenma Elementary School. They were planted in 1931 by the students who were graduating that year. The school buildings were all destroyed by the bomb, and 13 teachers/staff members and 280 students died. Students wrote the words of the song, "Winds Blowing the Plane Trees." The plane trees have become symbols of love and peace and held in affection by students and local people alike. To listen to the song, please visit http://www.tenma-e.edu.city.hiroshima.jp/mupura/puratanasun okazega.htm.

Reference (in Japanese)

23. Chinese Parasol Tree (Firmiana simplex)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1300m

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

1-2 Nakajimachō, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

The trees used to be at the courtyard of the Hiroshima Post and Telecommunication Bureau, which was located to the northeast of the castle. They were transplanted to the north side of the memorial museum in the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in 1973. The survivors of the atomic bomb were encouraged when the parasol trees had new buds in the spring of 1946. A song of the parasol tree called "Aogiri no Uta" was made by a nine-year old girl in 2001. It can be listened to thanks to an audio system in front of the tree. Please press the button there or visit to listen to the song.

Reference

24. Japanese Black Pines (Pinus thunbergii)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1300m

Sumiyoshi Shrine

5-10 Sumiyoshi-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located at Sumiyoshi Shrine by the Honkawa River. There are two A-bombed black pines. The shrine was established in 1733 and moved to this place in 1799. The building was burned in the atomic bombing, but the pine trees survived. According to the yellow plate, these trees were transplanted to the present locations when the main hall was renovated in 1995.

25. Ginkgo, Muku Tree, and Japanese Black Pine (Ginkgo biloba; Aphananthe aspera; Pinus thunbergii)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1370m

Shukkeien garden

2 Kami-nobori-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Shukkeien Garden was created in 1620 by Ueda Soko (1563-1650) for the lord Asano Nagaakira (1586-1632). Soko, a samurai, was one of the greatest tea masters of that time and the tea school originated by him has continued for 16 generations. There are three A-bombed trees in the garden: a ginkgo, a black pine and a muku. The ginkgo tree is more than 200 years old. It is slanting toward the hypocenter because after the blast moved outward from the city center, the air gushed back in. The trunk of the tree is about 4 meters in circumference and about 17 meters tall. The branches are pruned so that the tree won't fall down. After the atomic bomb, many people fled to this garden and died here. In 1987, about 64 people's remains were excavated and moved to the memorial mound in the Peace Memorial Park. Near the A-bombed black pine, there is a monument erected in 1988 for these victims. The black pine is supported by wire. The muku tree is at the far end of the garden in the northwest corner. It has a big scar but still bears sweet fruits. Open hours: 9:00-18:00 (April-September), 9:00-17:00 (October-March) Admission: 250 yen (adult)

Reference

26. Japanese Hackberry (Celtis sinensis var. japonica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1400m

On the west bank of the Kyobashi River near Kamiyanagi-bashi Bridge

12 Hashimoto-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

This tree was registered as an A-bombed tree thanks to the person who used to live here and could testify that the tree was in his garden at the time of the atomic bombing.

27. Weeping Willow (Salix babylonica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1400m

On the west bank of the Kyobashi River near Kamiyanagi-bashi Bridge

12 Hashimoto-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

The relatives of Hara Tamiki (the author of Summer Flowers) used to live here. Based on the testimony of Tamiki's nephew, the willow was registered as an A- bombed tree. There are many stone steps along the riverside. They are called gangi, showing that Hiroshima was a water city, where many boats travelled up and down the river.

28. Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1420m

Joseiji Temple

15-22 Sumiyoshi-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

When the main hall of the temple was rebuilt in 1981, they created a hole in the staircase for the ginkgo tree.

29. Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1430m

Peace Boulevard

1 Nishi-kanon-machi, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima

Located on the north side of the Peace Boulevard. It was transplanted to this place, from about 20 meters away, when this area was redeveloped after the atomic bombing. Despite a big scar, the tree has red fruits in summer.

30. Japanese Hackberry (Celtis sinensis var. japonica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1440m

Noboricho Junior High School

6-29 Kami-nobori-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

There are two hackberry trees at Noboricho Junior High School. The school was established in 1947 after WWII. Sasaki Sadako (1943-1955), famous for her one-thousand paper cranes, was registered as a student at this school in April 1955 when she was 12 years old, but she had been hospitalized due to leukemia and was unable to attend any classes. When she died on October 25 of that year, her classmates and others raised funds to erect the Children's Peace Monument in the Peace Memorial Park. It was unveiled in 1958.

Reference (in Japanese)

31. Japanese Flowering Apricot and Others (Prunus mume var. purpurea)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1580m

Tokuoji Temple

8-8 Higashi-hakushima-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Tokuoji Temple was first established in Kishu, today's Wakayama Prefecture, and moved here in the 17th century. The buildings were burned in the atomic bombing and rebuilt after the war. There are about ten A-bombed trees here, including two apricot trees, a maple, a pine, a camphor tree and several oaks (Quercus glauca). There are also A-bombed stone statues of Jizo Bodhisattva.

32. Japanese Fern Palms ((Cycas revoluta)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1590m

Senryuji Temple

10-8 Kyobashi-cho, Minami-ku, Hiroshima

There are two A-bombed fern palms. They were burned by the atomic bomb but sprouted from the roots. They were later divided.

33. Ginkgo and Others (Ginkgo biloba)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1640m

Senda Elementary School

2-1-34 Higashi-senda-machi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Senda Elementary School was established in 1924. The number of students exceeded 2,000 in 1938. There were 1,514 students in 1944, but in March 1945, students' evacuation started at elementary schools in Hiroshima, and there were fewer students remaining in the city. Three teachers and 41 students were killed in the atomic bombing and all school buildings were burned down, leaving only the bent iron framework of the auditorium. Still, some trees survived. The A-bombed trees at this school include camphor trees, wisterias, Japanese fern palms, junipers, a ginkgo, a hackberry and pines. The hackberry was in Kokutaiji, closer to the hypocenter, but transplanted to this school in around 1948. The ginkgo tree was at the Hiroshima Higher Normal School nearby and transplanted here in the late 1960s. Open-air classes started in September 1945. Gradually school buildings were built. In December 1947, five classrooms were added with the support of Major Higgins from Australia, and finally all students were accommodated in classrooms.

Reference (in Japanese)

34. Weeping Willow (Salix babylonica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1700m

At the eastern foot of Tsurumi Bridge

20 Hijiyama-honmachi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima

Located at the foot of Tsurumi-bashi Bridge at the eastern end of the Peace Boulevard. "Tsuru" means cranes. Cranes used to fly to Hijiyama Hill, located further east of this bridge, from where people could bird-watch. In 1880, the original wooden bridge was built and named Tsurumi-bashi, meaning "crane watching bridge." The bridge caught fire at the time of the atomic bomb, but people tried to extinguish the fire. Thanks to their efforts, the bridge did not fall, and many survivors fled to Hijiyama Hill crossing it. It was replaced by another wooden bridge in 1957. After a steel pedestrian bridge was constructed near this bridge, the wooden bridge was dismantled in 1974. The current bridge was built in 1990. When it was built, the willow was transplanted to the present location. Its trunk is weak, but a new willow tree from the same root has grown into a big tree. The current bridge won the Civil Engineering Design Prize in 2001.

Reference 1: 『河岸の戦後史2 京橋川』 広島市博物館資料調査報告書 VI, Reference 2

35. Japanese Summer Orange Trees (Citrus natsudaidai)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1700m

Komyoin Temple

23-2 Hakushima-kuken-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located at Komyoin Temple near the railway track. There are two summer orange trees. White blossoms bloom in spring. The temple was burned, but the main Buddha (medicine Buddha) had been evacuated to Fudoin Temple. The new temple building was built in 1983.

36. Kurogane Holly (Ilex rotunda)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1770m

Kanon Elementary School

2-1-26 Kanon-honmachi, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima

Hiroshima Prefectural Second High School was located at this place at the time of the bombing. The first year students were engaged in the so-called demolition work of houses in the city center near the Peace Park of today. Most of them died instantaneously. Orimen Shigeru was one of them. He was 13 years old. His scorched lunch box is exhibited in the memorial museum. The school buildings too were seriously damaged. Seven teachers and 343* students of the high school died in the atomic bombing. In 1950, the school, now called Hiroshima Kanon Senior High School, moved a few hundred meters to the south, and this elementary school opened here in the same year. This tree was donated by a neighbor to the elementary school in 1989 when his family moved out of the area. The tree had a crack from the atomic bombing, and a typhoon broke it into half from the crack.

* According to the website of Hiroshima Kanon Senior High School. See also No.38 Camphor trees.

37. Ginkgo, Japanese Black Pine, and Japanese Fern Palm (Ginkgo biloba; Pinus thunbergii; Cycas revoluta)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1780m

Myojoin Temple

2-6-25 Futabanosato, Higashi-ku, Hiroshima

There are three A-bombed trees in Myojoin Temple near the Kyobashi River. Most of the temple structures were burned down by the atomic bomb. The present temple building was reconstructed in 1974. There are many temples and shrines around here. In Japan, the northeast direction is considered "kimon" (devil's gate), so in order to protect the castle, many temples and shrines were gathered in the northeast direction of the castle by the lords of Hiroshima. Myojoin Temple was one of the largest temples and used to include Hachimangu, today's Tsuruhane Shrine. See also No.41 Ginkgo trees and others.

38. Camphor Trees (Cinnamomum camphora)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1800m

Kanon Elementary School

2-1-26 Kanon-honmachi, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima

There are four A-bombed camphor trees at the north side of this school. Hiroshima Prefectural Second High School was here at the time of the atomic bombing. The school buildings were heavily destroyed. The number of the victims is unknown, but 322* students who were at the demolition site of buildings near the Peace Park of today died in the atomic bombing, alongside the accompanying teachers. In 1950, the high school moved out, and this elementary school was opened. Permission is required to enter the school, but these trees can be seen from outside.

*According to the signboard at the elementary school. See also No.36 Kurogane holly.

39. Cherry Tree (Cerasus ×yedoensis)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1800m

Sanyo Buntokuden

7-1 Hijiyama-cho, Minami-ku, Hiroshima

There are two A-bombed cherry trees at Sanyo Buntokuden, located near the foot of Hijiyama Hill, next to Tamon-in Temple. Buntokuden was built in 1934 to mark the centennial of Rai Sanyo's death. Rai Sanyo was a famous scholar, and his museum is in the city center. (See No.2 Kurogane holly.) As WWII aggravated, parts of city government functions were moved to Sanyo Buntokuden. After the war, this was used as Asano Library and a social education facility (now closed). On the top of the roof, there is a nine-ring ornament, which was bent due to the atomic bombing. The atomic bomb exploded in Hiroshima at 8:15 a.m. on August 6, 1945. On the evening of August 6, the prefectural air-defense headquarters were moved to Tamon-in at the foot of Hijiyama Hill, although the temple roof was severely damaged. On August 7, the headquarters were moved again to the East Police Station, but the temple was used to receive relief goods and arrange distributing rice balls to the survivors who had fled to Hijiyama Hill. Many survivors were also given first-aid treatment there. The belfry is one of the existing A-bombed buildings.

Reference: 『被爆 50 周年 ヒロシマの被爆建造物は語る―未来への記録』 広島 市 1996

40. Cherry Tree and "Tabunoki" (Prunus × yedoensis; Persea thunbergii)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1800m

Ikari Shrine

12-20 Hakushima-kuken-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located at Ikari Shrine in Hakushima. This is one of the oldest shinto shrines in Hiroshima. These trees were burned by the atomic bomb, but they later sprouted from the roots. The shrine was completely burned but reconstructed in 1965. "Ikari" means anchor. The name of the shrine was derived from the fact that many ships anchored here and prayed for safe navigation. The area of Hakushima was an island called "Hakoshima" until the 16th century.

Reference: 『二葉の里歴史の散歩道~歴史と平和 緑と安らぎ~』 広島市東区

41. Japanese Black Pine, Ginkgo, and Camphor Tree (Pinus thunbergii; Ginkgo biloba; Cinnamomum camphora)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1810m

Tsuruhane Shrine

2-5-11 Futabanosato, Higashi-ku, Hiroshima

Located at Tsuruhane Shrine next to Myojoin Temple near the Kyobashi River. The shrine has a history of more than 800 years. It was moved to its present location in the 19th century. The name of the shrine was changed to Tsuruhane Shrine in 1872 because the hill behind the shrine looks like a crane ("tsuru") stretching its wings ("hane"). See also No.37 Ginkgo tree and others.

42. Bohdi Tree and Camellia (Tilia Miqueliana; Camellia japonica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1820m

Hoshoin Temple

12-4 Hakushima-kukencho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located at Hoshoin Temple next to Ikari Shrine. The camellia was about 10 meters tall and a symbol of the community. It was burned but sprouted again from the stump. There is a scorched scar at the bottom of the tree. A second-generation Bohdi tree was planted at Hakushima Elementary School to celebrate the centennial of the school in 1973. Hoshoin Temple was established at this location in 1598, after Mori Terumoto moved to Hiroshima Castle. The temple was located in the northeast direction (the bad luck direction called kimon) to protect the castle. Hoshoin Temple and Ikari Shrine were one temple/shrine complex but were separated in 1868. After the atomic bombing, the main hall was rebuilt in 1949, and again in 1974, when the trees were relocated to the present locations.

Reference: 『開創四百年記念誌』 真言宗寶勝院 1998 年

43. Camphor Tree, Japanese Flowering Apricot, and Camellias (Cinnamomum camphora; Prunus mume var. purpurea; Camellia japonica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1850m

Misasa Elementary School

1-9-25 Misasa-machi, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima

Located at Misasa Elementary School. The A-bombed camphor tree was transplanted to this elementary school from a private house on the north side of the Japan Electric Meters Inspection Corporation in 1954. It is in a beautiful triangular shape. The apricot and the two camellia trees (one with red blossoms with white spots, and the other with pink blossoms) were donated later to the school and registered as A-bombed trees in 2009.

44. Camphor Tree and Quince (Cinnamomum camphora; Chaenomeles speciosa)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1850m

Misasa Shrine

1-11-5 Misasa-machi, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima

The A-bombed camphor tree was donated to this shrine by the same person who gave an A-bombed camphor tree to Misasa Elementary School. The leaves of this tree are larger than ordinary camphor leaves. The quince blooms in spring and bears fruit by summer. The shrine was established in the 16th century. It was moved here in 1654.

45. Camphor Tree (Cinnamomum camphora)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1870m

Koryuji Temple

1-6-9 Misasa-machi, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima

The tree was burned by the atomic bomb but sprouted from the stump. Today there are three trunks from the same roots. The temple was also burned down by the atomic bomb. The main hall was rebuilt in 1960.

46. Japanese Fern Palm (Cycas revoluta)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1880m

Shingyoji Temple

5-10 Hakushima-kuken-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

The palm tree was burned by the atomic bomb but sprouted from the roots.

47. Pyramid Juniper (Juniperus chinensis "Kaizuka")

Distance from the hypocenter: 1900m

On the sidewalk on the east side of Fukushima Nursery School

1 Chome-18-1 Fukushimachō, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima

Located on a sidewalk by a nursery school. Before the war, there was a complex of facilities around here, including a community hall, nursery school, a clinic and others.

48. Japanese Black Pine (Pinus thunbergii)

Distance from the hypocenter: 1900m

Myosenji Temple

2-6-3 Danbara, Minami-ku, Hiroshima

Myosenji Temple is located on the north side of Hijiyama Hill, in Danbara. This pine tree and the temple gate survived the atomic bombing. They were moved about 15 meters south to the current location at the time of the redevelopment of this area in 1995.

Reference: 『被爆 50 周年 ヒロシマの被爆建造物は語る―未来への記録』 広島 市 1996 年

49. Camphor Trees (Cinnamomum camphora)

Distance from the hypocenter: 2030m

Senda Park

3 Chome-8 Sendamachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located at the east side of Senda Park. More than 20 camphor trees are registered as A-bombed trees (though there are also many not registered as such). Hiroshima Technical College (formerly called Hiroshima Higher Technical School) was located here. In 1949, this school and Hiroshima Municipal Higher Technical School were combined to establish the Faculty of Engineering of Hiroshima University. At the western side of the park, Hiroshima Prefectural Technical High School was located. In 1953, it moved to Deshio, the present location of the high school. Senda Park was made after Hiroshima University's Faculty of Engineering was moved to the present campus in Higashi Hiroshima in 1982.

Reference 1:『広島原爆戦災誌 第四巻』 広島市 1971年, Reference 2

50. Camphor Tree (Cinnamomum camphora)

Distance from the hypocenter: 2100m

At the east side of ALSOK Hall (Hiroshima Prefectural Culture and Art Hall)

19-1 Hakushima Kitamachi, Naka Ward, Hiroshima

Located along the tracks of the new transit system, Astramline, near ALSOK Hall. There are 12 registered A-bombed camphor trees. Before the transit system was constructed in 1994, the streets were widened. At that time, these trees were moved to the present location.

51. Cherry Tree and Japanese Black Pines (Prunus × yedoensis; Pinus thunbergi)

Distance from the hypocenter: 2110m

Yasuda Girls' High School

1-41 Hakushima-kitamachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located at Yasuda Girls' High School, there is one A-bombed cherry tree and several A-bombed pine trees. This high school was located near Hiroshima Castle at the time of the bombing. The atomic bomb killed 328 teachers and students there.

52. Weeping Willow (Salix babylonica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 2160m

Minami Elementary School

1-15-32 Minami-machi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima

There is a big scar in the trunk of this willow tree, but it is thriving. The white board says, "The tree teaches us the power and sanctity of life." This area was gradually reclaimed, from the 17th century through the Edo period. The elementary school was established in 1920. In 1945, almost all of the school buildings were destroyed by the atomic bomb.

Reference (in Japanese)

53. Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)

Distance from the hypocenter: 2160m

Anrakuji Temple

1-5-29 Ushita-honmachi, Higashi-ku, Hiroshima

A hole is made in the temple gate to allow the ginkgo tree to grow. This is a male tree, so the tree does not bear any ginkgo nuts. There are charred parts high up in the trunk. Anrakuji Temple was built here in 1533. It was burned down in 1758 but rebuilt in 1788. The temple was heavily damaged by the atomic bomb. The main hall is one of the A-bombed buildings. It was restored in 1994 but still slants to the north from the blast of the atomic bomb. The ginkgo tree saved the temple from being burned down.

Reference: 『被爆 50 周年 ヒロシマの被爆建造物は語る―未来への記録』 広島 市 1996 年

54. Camellia and Others (Camellia japonica)

Distance from the hypocenter: 2160m

Yoshijima Inari Shrine

1-8-6 Yoshijima-nishi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

There are various A-bombed trees including a camellia, a camphor, two black pines, a hackberry and a kurogane holly. The shrine was established here in 1787.

55. Crinum Lilies (Crinum)

Distance from the hypocenter: 2200m

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

1 Nakajima-cho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima

Located in the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park to the north of the memorial museum. These crinum lilies were exposed to the atomic bomb in Danbara on the other side of Hijiyama Hill. They were burned, but later a leaf sprouted from a burned bulb. It was found by a former soldier who had been stationed in Danbara at the time of the bombing. He kept the crinum lilies at his home in Kamakura and donated some to the Peace Memorial Park in 1969.

Reference (in Japanese)